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Thread: New tank issues!

  1. #1
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    New tank issues!

    Hello all,
    I'm in the process of setting up a tank that was taken out of storage. I know it doesn't leak (I tested it and water level remained the same for 1 week). Bought a new LED light, as the original kicked the bucket. Picked up a used filter and air pump because the ones I had no longer worked. Imagine, only 20 years old and they stopped working! I'm older than that and I work just fine!!! Click here to enlarge

    I also got substrate, went rock hounding and tried to find driftwood. That is still a work in progress...

    My big issue is that I don't know what to put in the tank. It's a 27 gallon hex tank, and the problem I had with it way back when is that the top was empty. I can't put a lot of fish in it because of the O2 exchange (from what I read online), so aquascaping will have to fill the area visually.

    I am looking for some advice on what to put in there for aquascaping and for fish... I'm thinking of creating a small slope from the back to the front, and possibly creating a rock face to build it up visually. Not too high of a slope, maybe 3 or 4 inches above the substrate, then the rock face (or cliff I guess) (making possibly 6 to 12 inches high). Also, using some type of vals and/or moneywort to get green height in the background, behind the rocks. Anubias or some other smaller plant in front. The tank is 24 inches high, so I have a lot of height to play with... I'm also pondering making a driftwood tree with moss, but I'm worried there will be too much in there, and too much work to upkeep. I work a lot already, and I don't want to bite off more than I can chew. Last thing I need is to have to devote 6 hours a week trimming moss... I don't even have time to cut my grass!

    For fish, I was thinking 12 Ember Tetras, 6 Platys and 1 red honey Gourami. Apparently, I'm obsessed with orange. Substrate and backgroundare black.

    Any thoughts? Click here to enlarge

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    Well if you aren't using CO2, I don't think you will have to worry too much about trimming plants. I use excel (no CO2) and the plants don't grow super fast or anything. I think moss trees are neat, but I have never done one myself.
    Slopes are neat, but I have plecos in every tank, so that don't let me do slopes really haha.

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    Thanks. I intend on keeping as low tech as possible, at least to start. And no plecos. Too big for that little tank. The poor thing would probably be able to tickle it's bristles with it's own tail eventually! Click here to enlarge

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    Honestly, I'd take out a pencil and several pieces of paper, and get drawing.. Try to draw down what you're imaging from your tank. As well keeping it realistic from what the plants can grow into, as well pieces of wood, rock, etc.

    It helped me quite a bit with doing a 125 gallon three times now.. trust me. Also you don't need the best artistic touch, just some knowledge of how your plants grow.

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    Thanks for the input. More research! Thank goodness for forums and google!

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by egapelc Click here to enlarge
    Hello all,
    I'm in the process of setting up a tank that was taken out of storage. I know it doesn't leak (I tested it and water level remained the same for 1 week). Bought a new LED light, as the original kicked the bucket. Picked up a used filter and air pump because the ones I had no longer worked. Imagine, only 20 years old and they stopped working! I'm older than that and I work just fine!!! Click here to enlarge

    I also got substrate, went rock hounding and tried to find driftwood. That is still a work in progress...

    My big issue is that I don't know what to put in the tank. It's a 27 gallon hex tank, and the problem I had with it way back when is that the top was empty. I can't put a lot of fish in it because of the O2 exchange (from what I read online), so aquascaping will have to fill the area visually.

    I am looking for some advice on what to put in there for aquascaping and for fish... I'm thinking of creating a small slope from the back to the front, and possibly creating a rock face to build it up visually. Not too high of a slope, maybe 3 or 4 inches above the substrate, then the rock face (or cliff I guess) (making possibly 6 to 12 inches high). Also, using some type of vals and/or moneywort to get green height in the background, behind the rocks. Anubias or some other smaller plant in front. The tank is 24 inches high, so I have a lot of height to play with... I'm also pondering making a driftwood tree with moss, but I'm worried there will be too much in there, and too much work to upkeep. I work a lot already, and I don't want to bite off more than I can chew. Last thing I need is to have to devote 6 hours a week trimming moss... I don't even have time to cut my grass!

    For fish, I was thinking 12 Ember Tetras, 6 Platys and 1 red honey Gourami. Apparently, I'm obsessed with orange. Substrate and backgroundare black.

    Any thoughts? Click here to enlarge
    Hi , nice to see starting back in the hobby, i bet it won`t be long before tank #2 will arrive LOL.
    You mention a new light , can you post the model , possibly a link with the specs.The reason is with any planted tank Light is the determining factor of the type of plants, nutrition, etc, so knowing the pros & cons of the light will help greatly in the set up of your tank, no point having the brightness of sunshine and say you are going to have a low light tank with no co2 etc, that will be a recipe for disaster.
    In terms of the Aquascape, have a look around online and find a style that appeals to you, together with light , you should have a better idea of what plants you should use.
    Regards

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    Thanks Charlie.

    Here is the light info. It's an 18 in Current-USA Satellite Freshwater LED. This fixture extends to 24 inches, but I won't be using that feature, as my tanks is only 18 inches wide, but 24 inches deep. I'm not looking to grow a forest, but I don't want to have dead plants either. Slow growth is fine with me!

    Here is the link.

    http://current-usa.com/aquarium-led-...reshwater-led/

    I'd still rather stay away from CO2, at least until I get in the groove of keeping fish healthy. No point in getting overwhelmed, too stressful for everyone involved (with either lungs or gills).



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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by egapelc Click here to enlarge
    Thanks Charlie.

    Here is the light info. It's an 18 in Current-USA Satellite Freshwater LED. This fixture extends to 24 inches, but I won't be using that feature, as my tanks is only 18 inches wide, but 24 inches deep. I'm not looking to grow a forest, but I don't want to have dead plants either. Slow growth is fine with me!

    Here is the link.

    http://current-usa.com/aquarium-led-...reshwater-led/

    I'd still rather stay away from CO2, at least until I get in the groove of keeping fish healthy. No point in getting overwhelmed, too stressful for everyone involved (with either lungs or gills).

    That fixture as linked is only rated to deliver 15 PAR @ 12 inches - your tank without substrate is 24 inches deep- that in mind you would be around 7.5 PAR to the bottom.
    For a low light non co2 tank it is suggested to have ( depending on who is writing) 10-30 PAR.
    Lets assume you have 2 inches of substrate, you will be at the very minimum suggested PAR requirement, keep in mind these are only suggestions and we may all have various experiences, also most PAR testing is done with no water, which will further reduce light intensity.
    Just food for thought.
    http://current-usa.com/wp-content/up...parison-V3.pdf

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    So, if I'm understanding this right, not enough light to keep plants alive! :-(

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    You may get away with Ferns , Anubias & some mosses, who knows maybe some Dwarf Sagittaria and a few others.
    I always say , no harm trying , but you are not going in with great expectations.

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    Alright, thanks. may have to look at getting the upgraded one, the LED plus.
    The one I got was recommended by my LFS... I guess I'll set it up and see if I have any casualties. If I do, I'll order the stronger one. Could I supplement the existing light by adding extra LED lights to it? I have a few LED strips I purchased a while ago at a big box store, for decorative lighting
    "Suitable for use in confined spaces, such as cabinets, bookshelves and closets, as the LED light source emits low heat... to create atmosphere and personality in your home" i
    s how they sell it.

  12. #12
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    I had one of those Current satellite fixtures and they were no good for plants.I didn't like the storm and other mode effects either.All red seemed to spook some of the fish.
    I like discus cause discus like me.


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    I have used & still do these lights, just sold one extra & strongly suggest them, at the price point it is money well spent.
    It gives you the ability to raise or lower the light intensity as required.
    Here is the FS: thread i had
    http://www.eastcoastaquariumsociety....A451-18-inches

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Charlie Click here to enlarge
    I have used & still do these lights, just sold one extra & strongly suggest them, at the price point it is money well spent.
    It gives you the ability to raise or lower the light intensity as required.
    Here is the FS: thread i had
    http://www.eastcoastaquariumsociety....A451-18-inches
    I have one of these too and I really like them!
    ..` A woman needs a man like a fish needs a net. ..`

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    Thank you all. I'll keep that link in case my current one (PUN intended) fails!

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    I'm glad someone mentioned the low illumination values of the original lamp. That lamp is meant as a visual effects lamp and not a grow lamp. A tank that is 24" deep and 18" in diameter should probably have about 3000 directed lumens of light as a minimum value if you are going to grow plants. Ideally you would want 5000lm or more. Most LEDs run around 100 lumens per watt these days, so just multiply the wattage x 100 to get the lumen value from the stated watts. Its not a perfect way to calculate light values but its a quick and dirty way to determine if a lamp has enough output for your needs. In the case of this tank, you will need between 3000 to 5000 lumens to do what you want, or 30 to 50 watts of LED lamps.

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